Deaf school leavers in Scotland much more likely to attend university.

A BBC report today suggests ‘Deaf pupils ‘left behind’ by education system’ and goes on to state:

The charity also found that only 29% of deaf school-leavers go to university. The figure for hearing students is 45%.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-49226769

As always, no comparative data is offered to help us put it into perspective and consider how bad it might be but a  2015 study in England by the Consortium for Research in Education reported that only 7% went on to ‘Higher Education.’

https://www.earfoundation.org.uk/files/download/1264

A 2018 report in the Independent suggested that only 9% attended the more prestigious Russell Group universities.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/deaf-students-russell-group-universities-a-level-results-access-national-deaf-childrens-society-a8463301.html

A report in the Guardian, 8 January 2018, stated:

Educational support for England’s 45,000 deaf children is “in complete disarray” with a dwindling number of specialist teachers struggling to meet growing demand, according to research. A report by the Consortium for Research into Deaf Education says the number of teachers of the deaf has been cut by 14% in the past seven years, at the same time as a 31% increase in the number of children requiring support.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jan/08/educational-support-for-deaf-children-in-england-in-complete-disarray

No such criticism of the Scottish system has been made.

2 thoughts on “Deaf school leavers in Scotland much more likely to attend university.

  1. John August 5, 2019 / 3:29 pm

    Another of their gloom anddoom stories, nothing good ever happens in Scotland according to our State Broadcaster !

    Like

  2. Alasdair Macdonald August 6, 2019 / 5:20 pm

    The report was produced by a charity supporting young people with hearing difficulties, so it is, seeking to make the case for more resources for the education of such children. This is a common strategy by charities – presenting an eye-catching statistic, usually out of context.

    To an extent, I ‘accept’ this from charities, and I expect it, too. Publicity gets them more funds from the public.

    However, broadcastersnhave a duty to set the data in context.

    Like

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