Are some of us protected against Reporting Scotland’s vaccine scare?

gpmmr.png

‘Doctors are concerned that vaccination rates among adults and children will drop in rural areas because of a change in the way they’re administered under a new GP contract. MMR and flu injections are among those to become the responsibility of teams set up by Scotland’s health authorities. It’s designed to reduce the GP workload, but some argue it won’t work in less populated areas where people might miss visiting teams and have to travel long distances to clinics.’

The evidence? One GP representative (above) tells us it might happen.

The uptake among children for MMR, but not for the five-in-one vaccine which protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), was already lower in some rural areas in under the old contract:

immrates.png

The real variation across Scotland’s population, adult and child, is between the deprived (79% uptake) and the non-deprived (92% uptake) areas.

http://www.healthscotland.scot/health-topics/immunisation/overview-of-immunisations

Would it be unfair to suggest that this is about GPs losing power and income to pharmacists?

‘GPs are paid a dispensing fee of around £2 per prescription on top of the £7.64 fee.’ 

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/your-practice/practice-topics/practice-income/pharmacists-could-be-paid-more-for-flu-jabs-than-gp-practices-gpc-warns-/20010582.article

So, £9.64 per inoculation, taking about 5 minutes, £60 per hour, to administer by a nurse on just over the living wage? Nice wee earner?

They wanted the reduced workload but to keep the same income?

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Are some of us protected against Reporting Scotland’s vaccine scare?

  1. Legerwood April 15, 2019 / 3:43 pm

    I read this article earlier today and the thought did cross my mind that income loss might be involved somewhere but I also thought: why not mobile units going round remote communities to give vaccinations rather than people having to travel to a fixed centre?

    There are precedents – the mobile X-ray units in the 1950s and of course the Blood Transfusion units travelling around the country and setting up shop in local community halls.

    Vaccinations are pretty low tech so it would not cost much to equip and run mobile units to cover rural areas.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Alasdair Macdonald April 16, 2019 / 12:00 pm

      A Cynic replies,

      Mobile units would probably be based in places like Inverness or Oban, which are urban areas and urban areas have feral pigeons and feral pigeons ….. well, you know what and this would give BBC Scotland a chance to re-run its long running scare.

      PS I was cycling along the Clyde teaterday and I looked across at the BBc building and,…. there were pigeons perched on the roof!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s