£20 million Scottish renewable energy storage unit for Broxburn will be first in UK

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As you know, we’re increasingly producing too much energy from our wind farms and marine turbines:

‘Scotland Sets [Another] New Wind Power Record’

‘Wind farms powered 4 million Scottish homes last month’ and there are only 2.4 million ‘households’ in Scotland

When this happens, storage is the problem in matching demand to the fluctuations in supply. However, a new large-scale battery storage facility, the first in the UK, is to be built in Broxburn by the Trig company.

The Broxburn facility will story 20MW which is off course only a fraction of our daily needs of around 1 million MW but may herald the start of a trend.  Trig, as-a-whole, will have 774MW across Europe.

https://www.pressreader.com/uk/the-scotsman/20170815/282123521615400

https://www.energyvoice.com/otherenergy/147529/trig-lands-scottish-renewable-energy-storage-unit-20m/

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7 thoughts on “£20 million Scottish renewable energy storage unit for Broxburn will be first in UK

  1. Bugger (the Panda) August 16, 2017 / 5:25 pm

    pilot plants

    Like

  2. Contrary August 16, 2017 / 7:20 pm

    Not sure if they are pilot plants or not, but there seems to be a lot of large money making projects in the power storage sector! I thought it strange how the project was ‘bought’ by Trig, so I looked up another article on this and it seems that RES have nearly finished building the plant, and have ‘sold’ it to Trig (an investment-construction company?), and RES will continue building it for Trig,,, sigh, I have no idea how these big business things work. Seems like RES have taken on a lot of these projects and then sell them, is this normal process? Or is it that Trig takes over the investment for the final construction stages then retains it for operation – they have the deal to sell it to national grid.

    Anyway, this is good, makes renewables more productive – is there not a thing about how Scottish grid connectivity, being a reserved matter, is not up to scratch for us delivering (selling) all this power we are producing? My knowledge on this is rather weak!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Redrock August 16, 2017 / 7:35 pm

    20mw is a significant amount of capacity for grid balancing. Not clever enough to copy a link on my tablet but Googling ‘balancing the grid through battery storage’ will bring up an SIO article which explains it further. Essentially it cuts down the need for expensive standby gas/coal plants to smooth out peaks and troughs of demand. So it’s part of the infrastructure that is necessary for us to go fully renewable.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Redrock August 16, 2017 / 8:00 pm

    http://energy.sia-partners.com/commercial-use-battery-storage-viable-new-market-when-approached-right-strategy

    Sorry for error in above post should read’ SIA’ article. Been doing further reading,and learning to cut and paste on a tablet, the above linked article explains further the benefits of battery storage for the grid and it would seem that a 50mW battery would cover 70% of Dutch grid balancing so this 20mW facility would appear to be a bigger deal than you might think. More good news !

    Please keep up the good work and highlighting all the positive things happening as increasingly I am driven daft by the relentless negativity of the MSM.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Clydebuilt August 17, 2017 / 1:22 pm

    “Trig as a whole will have 774 mw across Europe” is that 774 mw of energy storage, then how much is already up and running. . . kinda implies that the 20mw is not a pilot for the company.

    Good to see this . . . Scotland needs more storage to make the most of her renewables . . .

    Like

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