English Health Secretary goes for pointless populist shaming as evidence-based Scottish national alcohol strategy is further strengthened

hancock policy

 From the Alcohol Policy Unit on 21st:

‘The Scottish government has published a new alcohol framework 2018, outlining 20 key actions that seek to ‘reduce consumption and minimise alcohol-related harm arising in the first place’. The strategy has three key themes including ‘reducing consumption’, ‘positive attitudes, positive choices’ and ‘supporting families and communities’, and coincides with the latest figures on alcohol-related hospital admissions in Scotland of 35,499 in 2017/18.  The strategy follows on from the implementation of Minimum Unit Pricing (MUP) earlier this year after a long running legal challenge by sections of the alcohol industry.’

Scottish Government policy, based on science, has previously been praised by public health groups especially when compared with the Westminster approach based on unscientific local partnerships and self-discipline. The Alcohol Policy Unit view of the latter is:

‘A new national alcohol strategy is reportedly in development for England and Wales, though there have been few signs that calls for it to follow a more evidence-based approach will be heard. Minimum pricing appears to be off the table according to a recent parliamentary answer stating “the new strategy will not include a commitment to introduce minimum unit pricing in England at this time”, but that PHE would review the impact in Scotland following its introduction this year, despite Wales and Ireland taking steps to implement MUP. Earlier this month the Health Secretary Matthew Hancock said people should take greater personal responsibility for their health to take pressure off the NHS, provoking dismay from behaviour change academics and alcohol groups. Hope that the strategy will halt the ‘crisis’ facing treatment services may be one area where advocacy groups will continue to focus efforts on.’

https://www.alcoholpolicy.net/2018/11/new-scottish-national-alcohol-strategy-framework-published-.html

 

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3 thoughts on “English Health Secretary goes for pointless populist shaming as evidence-based Scottish national alcohol strategy is further strengthened

  1. Bugger (the Panda) November 27, 2018 / 12:09 pm

    Someone I know here in France is always drunk; a functioning alcoholic. I have always worked in alcohol production and have my fair share of them.

    Often they appear sober, and ten minutes later out of their face. 30 mins later they appear sober again

    He was caught by Gendarmes on Monday morning after a weekend bender.

    He swiftly put up in front of a Judge and had his licence suspended for 6 months.

    2 days later he was offered a reduction in his suspension to a month if he gave a blood sample and attended an alcohol awareness programme. He hadn’t started the engine when caught.

    What they didn’t tell him is that the blood test allowed the doctors to estimate his long term drinking pattern.

    I am not sure what position is wrt to this result but, he could have his licence revoked and have to prove he has quit drinking before he can retake his test.

    Incidentally, he was using a UK licence which was confiscated on the orders of the Judge and a French one was issued to him and then witheld.

    France has the same alcohol limit as Scotland which is way lower than England

    Liked by 1 person

  2. annraynet November 28, 2018 / 12:26 am

    I remember the 50s when the slogan in France was ‘Jamais plus d’un litre de vin par jour’. It was also suggested that habitual aperitifs and digestifs were not a good idea but presumably they were ok now and then. So not every day then.

    Like

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