Scottish Private schools show state secondaries the way ahead’……to the 19th Century?

Private schools show state secondaries the way ahead

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4 thoughts on “Scottish Private schools show state secondaries the way ahead’……to the 19th Century?

  1. johnrobertson834 June 24, 2016 / 6:12 pm

    Response to my complaint to IPSO:
    Dear Professor Robertson,
    I write further to our earlier email regarding your complaint about an article headlined “Jenny Hjul: State schools should take lessons from private sector”, published by The Herald on 11 June 2016.
    On receipt of a complaint, IPSO’s Executive staff reviews it to ensure that it falls within our remit, and represents a possible breach of the Editors’ Code of Practice. The Executive has now completed an assessment of your complaint under the terms of the Code. Having considered the points you have raised in full, we have concluded that your complaint does not raise a possible breach of the Code.
    You complained under Clause 1 (Accuracy) that it was inaccurate of the article to report that Cameron Wylie is seeing an increase in applications to his fee paying school because this is not a national phenomenon. While we acknowledge your concerns, we note that the article was clearly presented in both tone and style as a comment piece in which the author was critical of state schools and attainment of those who attend them. In the context of a comment piece, we did not consider that it was significantly misleading for the author to apply the views of Cameron Wylie to other schools in the country. Further we note that you do not dispute the comments of Cameron Wylie. As such we could not consider your complaint as a possible breach of Clause 1.
    You complained under Clause 1 that it was inaccurate of the author to report that numeracy and literacy levels in Scottish schools are falling. While we acknowledge your concerns, the article was clearly presented in both tone and style, as a comment piece in which Jenny Hjul expressed her opinion that state schools should adopt some of the practices employed by the private sector. The author made reference to Cameron Wylie who has criticised the Curriculum for Excellence and made suggestions on how to lift standards in schools. We therefore considered that this was an opinion that the author was entitled to express. As such we could not consider your complaint as a possible breach of Clause 1.
    You complained under Clause 1 that it was inaccurate of the author to suggest that reforms in English schools have had a positive effect. In the context of a comment piece, the author was entitled to make this inference. As such we could not consider your complaint as a possible breach of Clause 1.
    You complained under Clause 1 that it was inaccurate of the author to report that academies have transformed prospects for children in England. In the context of a comment piece, the author was entitled to make this inference. As such we could not consider your complaint as a possible breach of Clause 1.
    You are entitled to request that the Executive’s decision to reject your complaint be reviewed by IPSO’s Complaints Committee. To do so you will need to write to us within seven days, setting out the reasons why you believe the decision should be reviewed. Please note that we are unable to accept requests for review made more than seven days following the date of this email.
    We would like to thank you for giving us the opportunity to consider the points you have raised, and have shared this correspondence with the newspaper to make it aware of your concerns.

    Best wishes,

    Isabel Gillen-Smith
    Cc The Herald
    Isabel Gillen-Smith
    Complaints Officer

    IPSO
    Gate House
    1 Farringdon Street
    London
    EC4M 7LG

    Tel: 0300 123 2220
    Website: http://www.ipso.co.uk

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  2. johnrobertson834 July 5, 2016 / 4:03 pm

    Jenny Hjul, Private Schools and English Education Champion at the Glasgow Herald wrote:
    ‘The sweeping reforms in English schools have shown that a disadvantaged start in life does not have to decide a child’s fate.’
    Is this evidence of these reforms Jenny?
    ‘New primary school tests criticised as [only] half of pupils meet standards’
    As Department for Education publishes results for year six tests, critics say government is gambling with pupils’ futures

    https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/jul/05/new-primary-school-tests-rubbished-as-only-half-of-kids-meet-revised-standards

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